Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Second marriage? Why you need to talk money early and often

Second marriage? Why you need to talk money early and often
Globe and Mail
Couples entering their second or third marriage need to get over their
delicate feelings and have those conversations, even if they are emotional
minefields. And remarriage is increasingly common. According to Statscan's
most up-to-date numbers, ...
<http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/household-finances/second-marriage-why-you-need-to-talk-money-early-and-often/article2123726/>

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

When Will I Move On Already?

Some experts assert that it takes a year for every five years of marriage to recover. That was about right in my case, and I've heard from many women that it took that long for them as well. This doesn't mean you are going to be miserable for the entire time. You may go through every emotion in the book, from despair to exhilaration.

There are three stages in the divorce recovery process. During the first phase, you flit from one thing to another. You may date different people, get rid of old friends and make new ones, travel to new places, try out new jobs. Abigail Trafford, author of the divorce classic, Crazy Time, calls this the Hummingbird phase. "Hummingbird people aren't able to reestablish themselves as new entities because they never allow themselves to confront the pain and anxiety of divorce or a new life. Their wings flutter too fast," she says. My Hummingbird phase included a long detour from grieving with Internet dating, which became an obsession.

The next level is foundering. You fall apart emotionally, you lose your job, your new romance breaks up, you can't seem to make enough money to get by, you despair that things will ever get better. Some people never stop foundering. We all know women (and men) who are still hanging on by their fingernails ten years after their divorce, bouncing from job to job, man to man, shrink to shrink. This is the stage where you can get stuck in cynicism and bitterness.


Read more
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/erica-manfred/why-havent-i-moved-on-yet_b_914526.html


Feel like talking, stranger? Couple who found love via randomly sent text message celebrate ten years of marriage Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.

Feel like talking, stranger? Couple who found love via randomly sent text message celebrate ten years of marriage

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER

Last updated at 6:18 PM on 2nd August 2011


Tina and husband Andrew came together after Yeovil-based Tina changed a couple of digits around in her number on a whim and sent a random text message with no idea who would receive it.

When Tina Baldwin sent a chance text message to a random number, little did she know her whimsical action would lead her to lasting love.

Andrew, who lived over 100 miles away in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire at the time, received the text asking: 'Feel like talking?'

Modern romance: Andrew and Tina Baldwin met after she sent a text message to a random number asking for a chat

Modern romance: Andrew and Tina Baldwin met after she sent a text message to a random number asking for a chat

Despite feeling wary at first, Andrew was persuaded to reply by his uncle and the pair kept in contact via text and then calls.

'I think I was more shocked than he was when I got a reply,' said Tina, 37.

'I was expecting someone to send a message saying "wrong number" or something, I have no idea what possessed me to send it.

'But he texted back saying yes, he asked me my details and we started talking.'

The couple chatted for over a month before either had any idea what the other looked like.

'It cost us a fortune,' added Tina. 'Neither of us had a phone contract, it was all pay-as-you-go. Eventually we both sent each other a picture and we'd confessed that our feelings were more than friendship before we'd ever met, we just had so much in common.'

After three months they met in person, and within just six months Andrew had taken the plunge and moved in with Tina at her home in Yeovil.

From texting to tying the knot: The pair moved in together six months after they first met and were married a year later

From texting to tying the knot: The pair moved in together six months after they first met and were married a year later

'We'd said right, we have so much in common we have to meet up,' said Tina. 'We first met up in a pub in Yeovil, I was really nervous and so was he, but once we'd met it was so easy.

'He started coming down to Yeovil every weekend after that, it cost him so much, eventually we said we either had to make something of it or give up.

'Neither of us wanted to give up so he moved down and we were married a year later.'

'It was really important to me he got on with my son Liam, who was five at the time. The first thing Liam did when Andrew arrived was go and sit on his knee, even though he'd never met him. I knew this was something good then.'

Andrew, now 31, said: 'I was travelling down every week, which was around a 140-mile trek both ways. We made a go of it and I moved down to Yeovil to live with Tina.'

Lucky: Andrew and Tina are now a happy family with children Courtney, aged seven, Kai, four and Tina's son Liam, 16. But they have warned others to be careful when telephone or online dating

Lucky: Andrew and Tina are now a happy family with children Courtney, aged seven, Kai, four and Tina's son Liam, 16. But they have warned others to be careful when telephone or online dating

Computer technician Andrew proposed to beautician Tina, two days before Christmas 2000 and the pair were married in Yeovil in September 2001.

The couple who will celebrate their ten year anniversary in September now have two children, Courtney, aged seven, and Kai, aged four, and Tina's son, Liam, now aged 16.

Andrew said: 'We definitely have no regrets, everything has turned out fantastically.'

But he still recommends caution to anyone in a similar position.

He said: 'Everyone is brought together by communications these days but you do have to be careful and err on the side of caution.

'There are a lot of people out there trying to scam others, and you need to be aware of the risks.'

Tina agreed. 'It could have been anyone who I met that day in Yeovil,' she said. 'Anyone sending a picture that wasn't them, but it turned out so well, we're very lucky.'



Courtesy: Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2021520/Feel-like-talking-stranger-Couple-love-randomly-sent-text-message-celebrate-years-marriage.html#ixzz1U1tLl1xa

Feel like talking, stranger? Couple who found love via randomly sent text message celebrate ten years of marriage Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.


Feel like talking, stranger? Couple who found love via randomly sent text message celebrate ten years of marriage

Last updated at 6:18 PM on 2nd August 2011

Tina and husband Andrew came together after Yeovil-based Tina changed a couple of digits around in her number on a whim and sent a random text message with no idea who would receive it.

When Tina Baldwin sent a chance text message to a random number, little did she know her whimsical action would lead her to lasting love.
Andrew, who lived over 100 miles away in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire at the time, received the text asking: 'Feel like talking?'
Modern romance: Andrew and Tina Baldwin met after she sent a text message to a random number asking for a chat
Modern romance: Andrew and Tina Baldwin met after she sent a text message to a random number asking for a chat
Despite feeling wary at first, Andrew was persuaded to reply by his uncle and the pair kept in contact via text and then calls.
'I think I was more shocked than he was when I got a reply,' said Tina, 37.
'I was expecting someone to send a message saying "wrong number" or something, I have no idea what possessed me to send it.
'But he texted back saying yes, he asked me my details and we started talking.'
The couple chatted for over a month before either had any idea what the other looked like.
'It cost us a fortune,' added Tina. 'Neither of us had a phone contract, it was all pay-as-you-go. Eventually we both sent each other a picture and we'd confessed that our feelings were more than friendship before we'd ever met, we just had so much in common.'
After three months they met in person, and within just six months Andrew had taken the plunge and moved in with Tina at her home in Yeovil.
From texting to tying the knot: The pair moved in together six months after they first met and were married a year later
From texting to tying the knot: The pair moved in together six months after they first met and were married a year later
'We'd said right, we have so much in common we have to meet up,' said Tina. 'We first met up in a pub in Yeovil, I was really nervous and so was he, but once we'd met it was so easy.
'He started coming down to Yeovil every weekend after that, it cost him so much, eventually we said we either had to make something of it or give up.
'Neither of us wanted to give up so he moved down and we were married a year later.'
'It was really important to me he got on with my son Liam, who was five at the time. The first thing Liam did when Andrew arrived was go and sit on his knee, even though he'd never met him. I knew this was something good then.'
Andrew, now 31, said: 'I was travelling down every week, which was around a 140-mile trek both ways. We made a go of it and I moved down to Yeovil to live with Tina.'
Lucky: Andrew and Tina are now a happy family with children Courtney, aged seven, Kai, four and Tina's son Liam, 16. But they have warned others to be careful when telephone or online dating
Lucky: Andrew and Tina are now a happy family with children Courtney, aged seven, Kai, four and Tina's son Liam, 16. But they have warned others to be careful when telephone or online dating
Computer technician Andrew proposed to beautician Tina, two days before Christmas 2000 and the pair were married in Yeovil in September 2001.
The couple who will celebrate their ten year anniversary in September now have two children, Courtney, aged seven, and Kai, aged four, and Tina's son, Liam, now aged 16.
Andrew said: 'We definitely have no regrets, everything has turned out fantastically.'
But he still recommends caution to anyone in a similar position.
He said: 'Everyone is brought together by communications these days but you do have to be careful and err on the side of caution.
'There are a lot of people out there trying to scam others, and you need to be aware of the risks.'
Tina agreed. 'It could have been anyone who I met that day in Yeovil,' she said. 'Anyone sending a picture that wasn't them, but it turned out so well, we're very lucky.'


Courtesy: Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2021520/Feel-like-talking-stranger-Couple-love-randomly-sent-text-message-celebrate-years-marriage.html#ixzz1U1tLl1xa

COUNSEL TO SUCCESS

COUNSEL TO SUCCESS

With students seeking help not just to cope with stress but also in making career choices, counselling has become an attractive career option. Aaditi Isaac report
Modern day counselling can help channelise one’s energies positively. In today’s world of competition, pressures and deadlines, counsellors play a vital role in shaping the life of children. Counselling of all types — school counselling, career counselling, or even clinical counselling involves a great deal of listening, giving direction, and a lot of patience.


The areas in psychology that are covered at the graduate level include general and social psychology, statistics, abnormal/clinical psychology, industrial and organisational psychology and developmental psychology. Students can become counsellors by doing their Master’s. They can also pursue certificate and diploma programmes by NCERT and Ignou.

SCHOOL COUNSELLING

With CBSE making it compulsory for all schools to have counsellors on board, school counselling has become a preferred career choice among psychology graduates.

“Fresh psychology graduates like school counselling as they can help children enhance their personality, perspective, help with exam related stress and talk to parents,” says Mamata Sharma, senior counsellor, DPS RK Puram.

School counsellors rarely join the profession with dreams of making the big money; they do, however, make a good living. “If a student is thinking of making a lot of money then counselling is not the right job. Students take this field more out of emotional satisfaction and gradually make a place for themselves in this field,” she adds.

Talking about the role of a school counsellor, Sharma says, “School counsellors have to keep in mind the aspirations of the child and give them the right direction. It involves listening, getting the information, comprehending the information, understanding the temperament of the child among others, and then guiding them in the right direction,” she says.

“After students finish their education, they apply to schools and based on their grade: TGT, PGT etc, their salary is fixed. Students with an MA in psychology get more salary as compared to the students who become school counsellors right after graduation. A primary counsellor could get anywhere between Rs 20,000 and 25,000. A middle school counsellor could get anywhere between 30,000 and 35,000 and a senior counsellor would get more than 40,000,” informs Sharma.

CAREER COUNSELLING

This field is emerging as an important area because a career counsellor can do both general and career counselling.

“Choosing a career is not based on a whim. One has to make an informed choice knowing one’s strength and weakness and career counsellors provide students with a range of options to choose from,” says Usha Albuquerque, a career counsellor who has been guiding students for a long time.

A career counsellor has almost similar approach to tackle things like a normal counsellor. So, how are they different? “Career counsellors understand people, empathise with them and at the same time they do a study on careers. They have to be well-informed about the emerging areas, upcoming careers, why a particular area is popular, where can students study according to their abilities,” she says.

One’s credibility is important in this field and it takes a long time to build it. “One gradually builds one’s credibility. One has to have the maturity and confidence that they will not be carried away by what they hear. Also, we conduct certain psychometric tests that help students.”

In terms of the career graph, Albuquerque says that usually when it comes to freshers opting for career counselling, they begin as school counsellors. “Freshers first attach themselves with school and with time and experience, if they want, they can get into career counselling,” concludes Albuquerque.

PARENTS’ VIEW

“We took our child to the career counsellor after she gave her class XII exam. We wanted her to get into English (Hons) but she wanted to do Geography (Hons). Initially, we weren’t open to the idea of taking her to a career counsellor but then we decided to find out a way to help her whether she takes English or geography. We weren’t sure about the scope of geography as a subject and what kind of job opportunities would be available after she finishes her graduation. The career counsellor helped us by guiding about the opportunities and cleared all our doubts. We are happy that we took our daughter to the career counsellor and now things are pretty clear,” says a parent.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

A robot who can "love"

A robot who can "love"
TG Daily
The white furball is equipped with microphones and cameras that allow the
bot to "recognize its user and hopefully build a long-term relationship."
Similar to a human-to-human relationship, the robot responds and falls in
love based on how its partner ...
<http://www.tgdaily.com/hardware-features/57552-a-robot-who-can-love>