Monday, September 17, 2018

37 billion hours of support to family members coping with the realities of aging and illness....Most ignored contribution of caregivers

MOST OF US KNOW SOMEONE who is a caregiver. Many of us (40 million, in fact) are caregivers, providing 37 billion hours of support to family members coping with the realities of aging and illness. Twenty million new caregivers joined their ranks last year, so chances are good that you, too, could become a caregiver (if you’re not already one).

Those are just some of the eye-popping stats revealed in a new report, “The Journey of Caregiving,” produced by Merrill Lynch in partnership with Age Wave, a thought leader in the study of aging and its implications for society.

While many previous studies have looked at caregiving’s physical and emotional challenges, very few have explored its financial costs. “Many caregivers find they have to dip into their savings or take on debt to cover expenses,” notes Cynthia Hutchins, director of Financial Gerontology for Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
Read more   https://www.pbig.ml.com/articles/a-new-report-uncovers-the-financial-costs-of-caregiving.html

Gender is still an unfinished agenda... says Life Coach VatsyayaN

Conditional better half?

........Life coach Suneel Vatsyayan agrees with this and points out that the matrimonial advertisement is an explicit expression of his actual expectation from a would-be bride, and these expectations mirror a disturning truth prevalent in our society. “In reality the ‘non-feminist’ is an undercurrent norm of inequality prevailing in the society. Unfortunately it is the deciding factor in marriages in general and relationships in particular. Gender equality makes people uncomfortable and their search for unequal partner remains unending and unfinished. This man looking for a bride seems to be degrading, offensive and wild in his expression of expectations from his partner. Gender is still an unfinished agenda for majority in our society irrespective of urban and rural divide,” he says.
Many women are the finding the non-feminist clause to be most disturbing.
 Many women are the finding the non-feminist clause to be most disturbing.
A matrimonial advertisement in a leading daily that is causing an uproar on social media has a 37-year-old industrialist seeking a bride, and his specific demands are that she should be a non-smoker, non-feminist, good cook, never have been married before or having any child, and should be under the age of 26 years. The ad that has gone viral is receiving a massive backlash and many are fuming at the regressive and misogynist mentality that still exists and is flaunted without any qualms.
“After so many phases of women’s movement I am still surprised that leading publications provide space for such regressive advertisements. In the name of generating revenues we can’t let online and offline portals get away with publishing such things. And some sites make it easier for people with prejudices to feel that their sexist/class/ caste views are valid and legitimate,” says Paroma Ray, activist.
wr
Many women are the finding the non-feminist clause to be most disturbing. “To me the most objectionable part of this ad is the non-feminist clause which clearly reflects that she should have no voice of her own. Without the non-feminist clause, conditions like non-smoker could be a personal choice, which even a woman looking for a match could have asked for. It is high time feminism is accepted as a right — a right to have equal rights to career, health, financial, fertility and social choices. A right to respect, dignity and freedom of expression. That is feminism. If anyone says that he wants a non-feminist wife he is declaring that he intends to be dominating, discriminating and perhaps abusive. This definitely deserves a massive public backlash where the country declares that such kind of dark paradigms are not acceptable anymore,” opines Niru Kumar,http://www.asianage.com/life/more-features/130918/conditional-better-half.html senior psychologist.

“Doing nothing with awareness can be positive....Life Coach Suneel Vatsyayan

Of devil’s workshopsThe adage goes, ‘An idle mind is the devil’s workshop’ but life coach Suneel Vatsyayan believes, “Doing nothing with awareness can be positive and can help you harness something  unexplored. There is no harm in stopping for a while for sometime but without losing control. It can also be destructive and can lead to risky behaviour like substance use.”....



 Many people are celebrating the slow moments of life that have become increasingly rare in this fast-paced world and embracing the joy of un busyness.

With the concepts of going slow, celebrating un busyness and the art of doing nothing gaining traction, boredom is no longer a bad space to be in. 
 With the concepts of going slow, celebrating un busyness and the art of doing nothing gaining traction, boredom is no longer a bad space to be in.
In these technology-driven times, it has become rare to hear that one is bored. There is so much to occupy one’s mind. Life is breathlessly fast-paced. Demanding careers, personal responsibilities, increasing social anxieties — the list is long... But there is one thing that people seem to unanimously agree upon — the ‘me time’, the lazy day and even a boring one is welcome now. With the concepts of going slow, celebrating unbusyness and the art of doing nothing gaining traction, boredom is no longer a bad space to be in. It can add new depth and dimension to life — the many plus points include respite from stress, a much needed mind pause, encouraging reflection and creativity. However, not all reasons to switch off lead to the pond of wisdom. We find out.

Striking a chord of creativity
Artist and curator, Alka Raghuvanshi believes that creativity has to emerge from a space of Eros and not Thanatos, where boredom lies. “One requires consistency in order to create but to take that work to a spectacular level, one also needs a stroke of insight — that will only happen when you are prodding. The one per cent of blessing that will change any work can only come when one waits. I might not finish a painting at one go. Breaks provide insights. But it can’t be called boredom that inspires us, I would call it resting.”


Author Ravinder Singh, who has written many bestsellers, also loves such days but carefully differentiates between boredom, laziness and free time. He says, “Certainly not a boring or a lazy day but a day where I can be myself and have time to spend and think about a lot of things. It is a time that I can enjoy on my own. I am alone but not lonely. It could also be a moment wherein I enjoy the eco-system around me that motivates me a lot. Getting up in the morning silence and knowing that I have the rest of the day to myself and there is nothing that I need to plan — it leaves me in a phase where there is a lot of energy around me....
https://www.deccanchronicle.com/sunday-chronicle/cover-story/010718/slow-inspirations.html